Servicios financieros rurales

La intermediación financiera es un proceso importante a través del cual los fondos son canalizados desde los proveedores hacia los posibles usuarios. En muchos países, la diversidad de instituciones, instrumentos y mercados han evolucionado para proporcionar servicios de intermediación financiera. Estos incluyen instituciones formales tales como bancos, instituciones semi-formales como cooperativas, y proveedores informales como los comerciantes y prestamistas. La prestación de servicios financieros en las zonas rurales es un reto particular, porque la agricultura presenta características únicas de dependencia de los recursos naturales, largos ciclos de producción y vulnerabilidad a los riesgos, mientras que las poblaciones dispersas aumentan considerablemente los costos de operación. Este Centro de Aprendizaje pretende reunir recursos que pueden ayudar a los proveedores de servicios financieros a operar eficientemente en esta realidad y a incrementar su alcance de manera sostenible.

Library Resources

título del recurso tipo ano recurso
Making index-based flood insurance socially inclusive in Bangladesh: Challenges and options Brief 2020

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Insurance

Floods and other weather-related disasters plague farmers in Bangladesh, and climate change threatens to exacerbate these risks. At stake are the livelihoods of millions of small and marginal farmer households that are at risk of becoming further entrenched in poverty. Lack of compensation or other buffering mechanisms means crop losses give rise to deepening cycles of debt, especially when cultivation is financed through loans. While neighboring India has developed strong policy and strategic direction for using risk transfer mechanisms, such as Weather Index Insurance (WII), as a disaster risk reduction tool, policy support in Bangladesh is lukewarm. To date, most WII schemes have been pilots implemented mainly by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) and donors. The Index-based Flood Insurance (IBFI) project of the International Water Management Institute (IWMI) hopes to adapt the pilot scheme it is trialling in Bihar, India, to Bangladesh. To understand how such a scheme can be made accessible, especially to marginal groups, fieldwork was undertaken in Sirajganj district. Here, a WII pilot project, funded by the Asian Development Bank (ADB), which offers insurance for crops during both the Aman and Boro seasons is ongoing. This brief is informed by findings from this fieldwork.

Editor CGIAR
Número de Páginas 6
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global, Asia
Bangladesh
Palabras clave Bangladesh, Index-based Flood Insurance (IBFI)
Recursos Relacionados
How Coronavirus affects Microfinance sector Brief 2020 English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Microfinance institutions

The global sanitary crisis also became an economic crisis. Economic activities are extremely limited in all countries and stock exchanges have lost almost a third of their value in less than a month. Quite logically, the worldwide microfinance sector is also not immune.

For this reason, the Grameen Credit Agricole Foundation's team launched a survey among its partners on March 11th in order to gather their first impressions and analysis, the impact on their clients' activity, on their institution and their potential needs. We also took advantage of our regular interactions with our partners to obtain as much information as possible. All further information in this document come from these resources. 56 Micro Finance Institutions (MFIs) responded to our survey, out of 75 reached partners (75% participation rate) with the last answers received on March 19.

 

Document  -  English (en)

Digitizing Value Chain Payments -- A digital solution from Ghana Technical Note 2020 English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Agribusiness and enterprise support, Servicios financieros rurales, Technology and outreach, Value chain finance

In Ghana, Tanager has been complementing the development of agribusiness markets by linking agribusinesses with ecosystems for cashless banking as a bridge between rural communities and brick-and-mortar banking services. In order to roll out mobile payment platforms across supply chains, and provide last-mile financial services to rural farmers, Tanager partners with agribusinesses, producers, and mobile network operators to streamline procurement processes. Mobile money platforms reduce the risks associated with agricultural value chain payments and offer an opportunity to extend other (financial) services. Tanager works with financial providers to adapt their services to the needs of agricultural buyers and suppliers, and supports producers to build their financial acumen, establish credit histories, and develop relationships with financial service providers.

This work was initially operationalized with one agribusiness (GADCO) in the rice value chain. With proof of concept, the technology now extends to three different crops (paddy rice, maize, soya beans) and seeds such as maize, millets, groundnut and cowpeas among five agribusiness partners. With financial support from AGRA, Tanager builds partnerships between smallholder farmers, financial institutions and value chain actors through the use of mobile wallets to access payments, credit and saving services. This initiative is a partnership between Tanager and AGRA through the Financial Inclusion for Smallholder Farmers in Africa (FISFAP) program. The key mobile network operator (MNO) partners are Vodafone and AirtelTigo, while the main banking partner was Premium Bank, after DALEX Bank and Capital Bank withdrew from the partnership.

This learning brief gives an overview of how the expansion of digital payments and financial services in Ghana has been promoted, even as the partnership role transitions to a local partner, Farmerline.

Document  -  English (en)

Strengthening financial services for roots and tubers value chains development in Africa Brief 2020

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Value chain finance, Agricultural finance

The demand for roots and tubers derived products has grown in the past decade, globally and regionally, leading to an increase in production in several African countries, where the majority of the producers are smallholder farmers. According to World Bank data (World Bank, 2013), this demand is expected to continue growing over the next two decades. In addition to this, governments in Africa are placing the commercialization of food staples at the center of national agricultural development strategies.

In spite of these opportunities for smallholders to commercialize their products in new markets, roots and tubers value chains in the region reain loose, fragmented and informal. Smallholders – both producers and processors – have a relatively weak collective bargaining power; they utilize low yield varieties, and their production and processing skills are weak, while the margins on the added value are often not paid off.

Small-scale producers and processors within roots and tubers value chains tend to rely mainly on informal financial service providers (such as informal moneylenders, friends and family, village loans and savings associations) to compensate for the lack of engagement of commercial banks and other formal financial institutions, who are unwilling (and often unable, due to gaps in technical capacity) to accurately target these actors with a tailored offer of financial services. A series of interventions are required to turn farmers and processors into more creditworthy and reliable clients for formal financial institutions. At the same time, measures are required to provide these financial institutions with tools and methodologies that can assist them in designing profitable and sustainable financial services that are suitable to the needs of roots and tubers smallholders and processors

Attention points business continuity for MFIs in view of the COVID-19 outbreak Technical Note 2020 English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Microfinance institutions, Policy Advice

This guidance note is organized in two main parts including guidance for analysis and a checklist of measures for crisis management and BCP. The note is meant to be a practical tool for MFIs. It can be used entirely or partially depending on the specific needs and stages of the situation.
The objective of the present note is to provide reference guidelines to Microfinance Institutions (MFIs)/Financial Service Providers (FSPs) when preparing their own Business Continuity Plan to face the pandemic crisis in order to:

  • Maintain responsible treatment of clients and support to come up with measures to cope with theCOVID-19 situation
  • Minimize the risk of infections and insure responsible treatment of employees and agents duringthe crisis
  • Minimize the risks for the institution in order to ensure business continuity during and after the crisis
  • Proactively communicate with all stakeholders.

 

Document  -  English (en)

Autor Hans Hekkenberg and Wendy Medrano-Lazo in collaboration with Paula Cortes, Soulemane Djobo, Catherine Liziard, Simone Uccheddu and Massimo Vita.
Editor ADA
Número de Páginas 20
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave Coronavirus (COVID-19), Microfinance Institutions, Financial Service Providers, Business Continuity Plan
Recursos Relacionados
Is there a case for for-purpose remittances? Report 2020 English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Remittances and payments

Remittances act as key sources of financial support for households: They reduce the likelihood of impoverishment, contribute to improved health and education, and provide greater resilience to financial shocks. To maximise remittance impact from the United Kingdom to these countries, this research investigated remittance senders’ demand for for-purpose remittance products and whether these products could lead to increased formal remittance flows, improved customer retention and increased customer acquisition.

There are two types of for-purpose remittance products:

Labelling is when remittances are sent to an individual with an intended purpose attached (e.g. sending your grandmother GBP100 with a note that says the money is meant to cover her visit to the doctor).
Labelling with enforcement is when remittances are sent directly to an institution instead of an individual (e.g. sending GBP100 directly to the doctor’s office to pay for your grandmother’s appointment).
The findings indicate that survey respondents reported that they would not only take up for-purpose remittance products but that these products would result in them sending more money more frequently and/or to more people. Piloting for-purpose remittance products is the next step in validating the business case of such products.

Document  -  English (en)

Autor Kate Rinehart-Smit, Camila Haux, Antonia Esser, Laura Muñoz Pérez, Mia Thom
Editor Cenfri
Número de Páginas 39
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave Remittance product
Recursos Relacionados
Agricultural finance and the youth, Prospects for financial inclusion in Uganda Paper 2020 English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Country studies, Africa, Inclusive finance

The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive assessment of the current state of financial inclusion of the rural youth in Uganda, with a specific focus on their engagement in the agricultural sector and the
financial services that are available to them to pursue their business ventures in this area. The study seeks to illustrate and bring to light the core constraints and opportunities associated with the provision of tailored financial services to young agricultural entrepreneurs in the country, while showcasing the essential role that key support actors (such as the Government, Central Bank, international development institutions, NGOs, foundations and many others) can play in fostering the provision and uptake of such services.

The study employs a methodological approach that blends extensive desk research with extensive data gathering at field level (both quantitative and qualitative) carried out through surveys and interviews with key stakeholders in Uganda’s agricultural and financial sectors. The study is meant to support FAO’s interventions in the country in the domains of financial inclusion and decent employment opportunities for the rural youth, with a specific view to enabling partnerships with relevant financial institutions and apexlevel organizations capable and willing to support the development of a range of youth-tailored financial products and other complementary activities.

Document  -  English (en)

Autor Niclas Benni, David Berno, Maria del Puerto Soria
Editor FAO
Número de Páginas 84
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global, Africa
Uganda
Palabras clave Financial Inclusion, decent employment, rural youth
Recursos Relacionados
Review of Integrated De-Risking Schemes to Promote Rural and Agricultural Finance in Sub-Saharan Africa Reference Material 2020 English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Risk management

In recognition of the well-understood macro-, meso- and micro-level challenges and risks associated with rural and agricultural finance, the need for a system-level approach to managing those risks is gaining increasing traction in the thinking and programming of the community of practice. Within this system-level view, the concept of holistic, integrated risk management as a means to de-risk the overall operating environment of agricultural value chains is recognised as a fundamental building block. Accordingly, numerous stand-alone and project-based “de-risking” arrangements have recently launched or are at various stages of design throughout sub-Saharan Africa and other regions.

These schemes employ a coordinated set of financing, risk-management and capacity building instruments to make agricultural finance less risky and to incentivise private financial service providers to increase their portfolio commitments to smallholder farmers and agri-SMEs. These schemes hold promise in addressing some of the persistent pain points in promoting the rural financial inclusion agenda and, by extension, contributing to the achievement of related Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

This webinar reviews the findings of a recent study by the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA), and the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) that analyses five such schemes in Sub-Saharan Africa in Nigeria, Ghana, Kenya, Togo and Zimbabwe. The webinar will share some findings concerning the operations and performance of these schemes and emerging insights into how they can be improved, scaled-up or replicated in other country and programming contexts. 

Opening:

The webinar opens with interventions by Mr. Adriano Campolina, Team Leader, Rural Institutions, Services and Empowerment (RISE) on behalf of Director a.i., Social Policies and Rural Institutions Division, FAO, Mr. Mawira Chitima, OiC, Sustainable Production, Markets and Institutions Division (PMI), IFAD and Ms. Hedwig Siewertsen, Lead Financial Inclusion, AGRA

Presenters:

Mr. A’kos Szebeni, FAO

Akos is a Senior Rural Finance Specialist at the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations where he provides technical assistance to FAO Member States, field programmes, and partner development finance institutions to design and implement initiatives related to inclusive rural finance, investment and risk management. In the past, he has held various managerial, advisory and analytical roles at global financial institutions - such as Citigroup - as well as boutique investment firms where he was responsible for financial and credit analysis; mergers and acquisitions advisory; capital raising and private equity transactions for emerging MSMEs globally. Mr. Szebeni holds a Master’s Degree in Development Economics from the University of Rome and is a candidate in the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) program. 

Mr. Ezra Anyango, AGRA

Ezra is a Financial Inclusion expert with over 30 years’ hands on experience in Management, Consulting, Governance and Regulation. He is currently Senior Programme Officer – Blended finance with Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA) based in Nairobi, with regional responsibilities. He has a wealth of experience having served in various senior positions within the Sub-Saharan Africa region, including with CARE International, DAI in East and West Africa regions, FINCA Malawi, Advisor to Kenya’s National Treasury, Advisor to the Africa Board Fellowship Programme (ABF) run by ACCION Centre for Financial Inclusion (CFI). Ezra holds both BA and MA degrees in Economics from Eastern Illinois University USA and has attended a short course in Finance (Financial Institutions for Private Enterprise Development (FIPED) programme at the Harvard Kennedy School of Executive Education.

Dr. Jonathan Ndaa Agwe (DM), IFAD

Jonathan is the Lead Regional Technical Specialist in Rural Finance, Markets and Enterprises in the Sustaianble Production, Markets and Institutions Division of the Strategy and Knowledge Department in the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) where he has been for the past 8 years. Jonathan is currently based in Abidjan and covering the 24 countries in the West and Central Africa region. He provides up-to-date technical advice to improve the capacity of IFAD and its partners to design, implement, monitor and evaluate policies, strategies, projects and programmes that promote access to sustainable inclusive financial services for pro-poor agricultural value chains and agricultural risk management. Jonathan has a cumulative work experience of over 33 years working in positions of responsibility in IFAD, the World Bank, Unilever Plantations and the Ministry of Agriculture of his home country. Jonathan holds a “Doctor of Management” degree in develeopment management and finance from the University Maryland University College, USA.

Webinar Recording  -  English (en)

Autor FAO/ CABFIN Partnership and the SAFIN network
Editor CABFIN
Número de Páginas 25 pages
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave de-risking, Rural Finance, Agricultural Finance, Risk Management
Recursos Relacionados
Institutional options available to ensure that Index-based Flood Insurance (IBFI) is socially inclusive in Bihar, India Brief 2020

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Insurance

Flood disaster is one of the greatest challenges affecting the livelihoods of the people of Bihar, India, hampering interventions aimed at addressing poverty, nutrition and health issues. Small and marginal farmers, tenant farmers and female-headed households are the most vulnerable to floods. Past insurance schemes implemented in Bihar, including both conventional and index-based flood insurance (IBFI) schemes, have been largely biased towards larger farmers. As a result, such schemes failed to reach the small and marginal farmers, and other vulnerable groups, despite them being the most in need of risk transfer mechanisms (Singh and Singh 2013). An institutional mapping was followed by interviews conducted with key stakeholders engaged in crop insurance schemes. Based on these interviews, this brief attempts to highlight the existing institutional mechanisms that can support tenant farmers and other vulnerable groups to gain access to IBFI. It also explains how the line agencies of the Government of India (GoI) and the State Government of Bihar (GoB) could use the identified institutional mechanisms to support the future upscaling of IBFI schemes.

Editor CGIAR
Número de Páginas 8
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global, Asia
India
Palabras clave India, flood, Index-based Flood Insurance (IBFI)
Recursos Relacionados
Supply Chain Finance--A digital solution from Kenya Paper 2020 English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Technology and outreach, Value chain finance

At harvest time many smallholder farmers sell their produce to informal traders who pay cash on delivery but offer low prices without additional services like input and extension services. Farmers need cash on delivery to meet their immediate needs such as school fees payments, family emergencies and credit repayments. However, payments are often delayed which can result in farmers getting indebted. The expectation of delay can also lead farmers to side-sell to informal buyers causing farmers to miss out on good prices and value addition services. It prevents the establishment of a solid relationship between farmers and professional buyers who offer better prices. Supply chain finance has rarely been tested with smallholders in loose value chains.

The paper lays out key lessons from the deployment of innovative supply chain financing solutions in the agriculture food value chains. A key takeaway in this paper is that due to the unstructured nature of the food crop markets and the dominance of cash-based transactions, the demand for supply chain financing solution is low in staple food value chains. It is also useful for researchers who may want to build a body of knowledge on value chain financing mechanisms that work. 

Document  -  English (en)

Editor The Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa
Número de Páginas 20
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Kenya
Palabras clave Supply Chain Finance; Digital, Kenya
Recursos Relacionados
Exploring Community-Based Financing Schemes to Finance Social Protection Paper 2020

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Insurance, Country studies, Asia and Pacific

Social protection, especially health care systems for the poor, is essential to reduce inequality.

Health-related shocks, such as death or severe sickness, can affect households’ budgets significantly and create serious household trauma, leading to higher possibilities of them falling into poverty traps. The main challenge of social protection is improving coverage to provide services to people in rural and resource-poor environments. Microfinance health-related services, such as community-based health insurance, are expected to fill the gap. However, this concept also faces many challenges, including sustainability, governance, a lack of data, and a lack of capable human resources to manage it. On the other hand, the fast development of financial technology has raised the development of the crowdfunding platform for medical services. However, this concept only finances the medical expenses of people with a serious disease whom insurance or research for new medicine or treatment do not cover.

The paper will explore new and innovative ways of financing social protection, especially to improve access to health care services for poor and marginalized communities. Taking advantage of the development of financial technology and looking at how we can address the failures of community-based forms of health insurance, it will connect the sustainable financing concept, such as hometown investment trusts (HTITs) and crowdfunding, with community-based forms of health insurance. This paper will propose two models: (1) the two-step HTIT health insurance model; and (2) the integrated HTIT health insurance model.

Autor Naoyuki Yoshino, Nella Sri Hendriyetty, and Erica Paula Sioson
Editor Asian Development Bank Institute
Número de Páginas 24
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global, Asia
Palabras clave community-based health insurance, crowdfunding, hometown investment trust fund
Recursos Relacionados
Responding to the pandemic: Guidance for financial service providers Toolkit 2020 English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales

Accion is closely assessing how the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting the financial inclusion industry and we are continually looking at ways we can help financial service providers prepare and adapt for disruptions that will occur in the markets and communities in which they work. The virus continues to spread to all corners of the globe and the financial inclusion industry needs to act promptly.

It developed the attached briefing note to share their findings on how COVID-19 is impacting the financial inclusion industry, and to provide recommendations and guidance for senior leaders of financial service providers to protect their customers, employees, and business operations. The findings included in this document and resulting recommendations were based on interviews with its partners to understand how they are addressing this unprecedented global pandemic.

Document  -  English (en)

Lay-away for agricultural inputs--A digital solution from Tanzania Technical Note 2020 English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Savings and deposits, Technology and outreach, Country studies, Africa

The expansion of mobile payments in sub-Saharan Africa has been at the forefront of the global increase in mobile account ownership. However, account usage remains a challenge in the region as elsewhere. This learning paper documents the Grameen Foundation (US) and Positive International Ltd’s value proposition for the use of digital savings tools for smallholders in Tanzania.

The project provided the opportunity to test how far agriculture households are willing to save for short term goals such as input purchases, and whether or not flexible layaway schemes can substitute conventional savings or credit products to meet financial needs in a timely and cost-effective manner.

Credit constrained farmers often choose not to buy inputs such as seeds and fertilizers or purchase poor quality inputs. While suppliers such as agrodealers are willing to provide inputs on credit, they have limited cash flows at their level and formal financial access is sometimes as difficult for suppliers as it is for smallholders. Another issue is the value proposition of inputs themselves – these need to be of good quality and applied at the right time and quantity for producers to see the kinds of productivity gain that would justify an ongoing investment on their part.

In this context a range of agribusiness are currently testing digital tools that can help build awareness on the appropriate use of inputs as also test savings models for input purchases. These agribusiness like Positive see digital tools as an important driver for input sales. The digital tool for input financing (DIFT) tested by Positive International and Grameen has four key focus areas: a crop investment plan to guide farmers on the best quality inputs, time and quantity of application in relation to their crops and land sizes/ condition; a flexible layaway program suited to farmer needs that allowed them to save up any amount, at any frequency for inputs; the timely purchase and delivery of the inputs to the smallholder farmers and agronomic training through the platform.

One key innovation in this project which was valued by farmers is the utilization of a savings-based approach with flexibility of payment size and frequency. However, following the launch of the pilot toolkit a significant amount of work and time was needed to build trust in the savings service, ensure market coordination between the distributor and agro-dealers and adapt the technology to the variety of crops and inputs needed by different farmers.

A general lesson learned is the need for building longer periods into the project timelines and ramp-up of agriculture and digital finance pilots because of the amount of time taken before customers recognize and trust a digital savings service. Additionally, because the layaway was intrinsically linked to the inputs delivery system – the timeliness and selection of inputs on offer made a significant different to customer use and retention. 

Document  -  English (en)

Editor Alliance for a Green Revolution in Africa (AGRA)
Número de Páginas 16
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global, Africa
Tanzania
Palabras clave mobile payments, agriculture household, saving for purchase, Tanzania
Recursos Relacionados
Micro-finance for small-scale fisheries Reference Material 2020

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales

The micro-finance for small-scale fisheries brochure describes why microfinance is important for small-scale fisheries and aquaculture and gives insight in microfinance and how it works. The benefits of microfinance for small-scale fisheries are listed and challenges and solutions are discussed. The brochure also shows how to create an enabling environment for credit and microfinance services in support of blue growth and presents models for the provision of microfinance services to small-scale fishers.

Moreover, it contains some case studies from successful aquaculture and fisheries microfinance projects in the Gambia, India and Viet Nam.

Autor Suchitra Upare, Raymon van Anrooy, Tipparat Pongthanapanich, Fabiola Espinoza, Henry DeBey, Keyan Liu and Jackie Alder
Editor FAO
Número de Páginas 16
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Africa, Asia
The Gambia, India and Viet Nam
Palabras clave Microfinance, small-scale fishery
Recursos Relacionados
Social Finance Annual Report 2019 Report 2020

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Insurance, Microfinance institutions

This report highlights the work of the ILO’s Social Finance Programme in 2019 and is structured around three segments of the financial sector:

(a) banks, microfinance institutions and credit unions working on financial inclusion;

(b) insurers that are contributing to development objectives, which we refer to as impact insurance; and

c) investors that are subscribing to a sustainable investing agenda.

Editor International Labour Organization
Número de Páginas 50
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave social finance, impact insurance, Financial Inclusion, sustainable investing
Recursos Relacionados
Making agricultural and climate risk insurance gender inclusive Brief 2020 English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Insurance, Gender

IFAD’s technical assistance programme INSURED (Insurance for rural resilience and economic development) has been building knowledge about how to strengthen women producers’ access to climate risk insurance. Working with partners, INSURED supported research, and fieldwork in Ethiopia including group discussions with smallholders about insurance options. 

Rural women in developing countries play a huge and diverse role in agriculture. Some are smallholders, others are wage labourers or unpaid workers on family farms. Some women are members of producers’ groups with independent incomes, or are in charge of market gardening for consumption and sale. Often with multiple roles, they are all part of the female farming community and pillars of rural household development. Overall, women make up about half the agricultural labour force in developing countries, and a smaller percentage own a farm. Together with their heavy burden of care work, they therefore shoulder significant responsibilities for both food production and income generation.
Farmers in developing countries live and work in high-risk environments, but not everyone is equally vulnerable. Women and men respond to risks differently, and women are harder hit by shocks. Women are more likely to die in natural disasters or suffer more from resulting food shortages, and their lower levels of economic participation undermine their resilience. Women’s vulnerability is rooted in interlocking inequalities. These include restricted access to resources, lower levels of land and livestock ownership, and of education. Because they mainly work in the informal sector, women have low levels of formal social protection. In addition, the impact of shocks on the whole household may affect them disproportionately. Crucially, they lack access to agricultural risk management techniques and to formal financial systems, including risk transfer options such as agricultural and climate risk insurance. 

Document  -  English (en)

Editor IFAD
Número de Páginas 4
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave Climate and environment, Gender
Recursos Relacionados
Competition and Digital Financial Services 2019

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Este recurso aparece en: ICT applications, Servicios financieros rurales, Rural Financial Services: General

These working papers investigate competition issues in digital financial services (DFS), providing both a survey of the main issues at each step of the DFS value chain as well as going in depth on topics such as digital data and credit card interchange fees. Drawing on both experience and research, these papers provide regulators and stakeholders alike a solid framework for understanding how competition policy, regulation and behaviour by market players can effect the level playing field of DFS in emerging markets.

Autor Ariadne Plaitakis and Matthew Soursourian
Editor CGAP Background Documents
Número de Páginas 128 pages
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave digital financial services, Competition, value chain, digital data, Regulators, competition policy, market players
Recursos Relacionados
Guidelines for micro-finance and credit services in support of small-scale fisheries in Asia Report 2019

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales

These Guidelines for increasing access of small-scale fisheries to credit and microfinance services in Asia have been developed to support the implementation of the Voluntary Guidelines for Securing Sustainable Small-Scale Fisheries in the Context of Food Security and Poverty Eradication (SSF Guidelines).

The purpose of these guidelines is fourfold, i.e. to:

• Increase awareness about the financial service needs of small-scale fishers (SSF) for more sustainable and inclusive access to finance;

• Guide policy and decision makers in the Asia-Pacific region and elsewhere, to help introduce and incentivize financial services to small-scale fishers, with the ultimate objective to encourage investment in the industry and by doing so influence and strengthen sustainability, ecological and economic viability of these fisheries;

• Build capacity among financial service providers, fisherfolk organizations, NGOs, and concerned government agencies, to design and implement financial service products and programmes that suit the needs of small-scale fishing communities and enhance social protection; and

• Promote financial services that incentivize and reward a responsible and sustainable conduct of fishing, fish processing and marketing operations.

The document commences by laying out the background and context, purpose and target audience of these Guidelines. It describes why microfinance and credit are important for small scale fisheries and why many small-scale fishers are not currently financed, which includes a discussion of risks. The Guidelines suggest entry and leverage points for actors interested in supporting the access of financial services for SSFs and compares agriculture (smallholders) and SSF business characteristics.

Autor Grace, L., van Anrooy, R.
Editor FAO; APRACA
Número de Páginas 56 pages
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Asia
Palabras clave Microfinance, small-scale fisheries
Recursos Relacionados
Harnessing the Power of Mobile Money to Achieve the Sustainable Development Goals Paper 2019

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Este recurso aparece en: ICT applications, Servicios financieros rurales, Rural Financial Services: General

Exploring ways in which mobile money contributes to the digitalization of finance

Over the last decade, mobile money has been disrupting traditional financial services and transforming the lives of hundreds of millions of people across developing countries. Today, with over $1.3 billion a day processed by over 866 million registered accounts in 90 countries, mobile money has evolved into a broader payments platform that provides access to life-enhancing services, such as healthcare, education, employment, transportation and social protection. As national economies become increasingly dependent on digital technology, the power of mobile money to harness digital finance for sustainable development is strengthening.

This report brings together existing evidence to explore the ways in which mobile money is contributing to the digitalization of finance to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The insights presented here illustrate the potential of mobile money to help achieve the 2030 targets by driving sustainable and inclusive growth, and providing solutions to some of the world’s most intractable development challenges.

Autor Mariana Lopez, Senior Advocacy Manager, Mobile Money (GSMA)
Editor GSMA
Número de Páginas 31 pages
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave Financial Inclusion; Digital financial services
Recursos Relacionados
Smallholder Households: Distinct Segments, Different Needs Paper 2019

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales

The 500 million smallholder households worldwide represent a large pool of potential financial services customers. However, they are not a monolithic group. To create and provide appropriate and desirable products for the segments within this group, financial services providers, government bodies, and agricultural development partners need to understand the segments they want to serve.

This Focus Note proposes an approach that distinguishes three segments of smallholder households—Subsisting, Commercializing, and Diversifying—according to their crop and livestock sales, amount of agricultural land, and smallholder livelihood profile. Using data from nationally representative surveys of smallholder households in Mozambique, Uganda, Tanzania, Côte d’Ivoire, Nigeria, and Bangladesh, the analysis estimates the market size of each segment and outlines recommendations on high-value financial solutions. Key findings include:

  • The Commercializing segment is the primary market for financial solutions related to agricultural goals.
  • The Diversifying segment is in transition and generally values the standard portfolio of financial services.
  • To serve the more vulnerable Subsisting segment at scale, partnerships, technology, and comprehensive approaches to financial and nonfinancial services are key.
  • Agriculture exerts a strong influence on the identity and income of smallholder households. But their financial inclusion is not primarily determined by their agricultural livelihood profile.
  • Farm and nonfarm aspects of their livelihoods need to be considered to help each segment of smallholder households effectively build resilience and capture opportunities
Autor Jamie Anderson, Ramesh Karuppusamy, Paul Enrico Neumann, Howard Miller; Ram Tamara
Editor CGAP
Número de Páginas 12 pages
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave Product Development, SME's
Recursos Relacionados
INSURED - Insurance for rural resilience and economic development Brief 2019

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Rural Financial Services: General, Insurance, Agricultural insurance

The paper examines a technical assistance programme increasing the resilience of poor rural households to climate risks. It explores insurance for rural resilience and economic development. 

INSURED is a USD3.8 million programme financed by Sida (the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency) and implemented by IFAD through the Platform for Agricultural Risk Management (PARM). The four‑year programme’s goal is threefold: – increase the resilience of poor rural households in the face of climate risks – build their capacity to manage risks – strengthen their livelihoods. The overall objective of INSURED is to protect the incomes of rural women and men and to promote investment in smallholder agriculture – by smallholders themselves and the public and private sectors, including financial service providers, value chain actors and governments. 

Key Facts

  • INSURED promotes climate and agricultural insurance as a cross-cutting tool in rural development 
  • USD 3.8 million
  • Financed by Sida
  • Four years: 2018-2021
  • Implemented by IFAD through PARM
  • Geographical focus: Global – with core activities in Cambodia, Indonesia, Uganda, Zambia
Autor Massimo Giovanola, Technical Specialist at IFAD, and Emily Coleman, Financial Inclusion and Insurance Expert at IFAD
Editor International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD)
Número de Páginas 2 pages
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave rural resilience, Economic Development, Technical Assistance, smallholder investment in agriculture
Recursos Relacionados
Access to markets for small actors in the roots and tubers sector. Tailored financial services and climate risk management tools to link small farmers to markets Report 2019

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Risk management

The roots and tubers industry in sub-Saharan Africa has been growing steadily in recent years. Nevertheless, a series of challenges, including lack of access to finance and climate change related events, has prevented the majority of actors in these value chains, who are mainly small farmers and small processors, from taking advantage of such growth. In order to properly assess such challenges, the project “Strengthening linkages between small actors and buyers in the roots and tubers sector in Africa” conducted a series of studies to identify relevant gaps, constraints and opportunities to develop tailored financial products and risk management strategies for small farmers. The present publication provides a summary of the most important lessons learned, with the related policy recommendations.

Autor Pera, M., Bavagnoli, M. & Benni, N.;
Editor Food and Agricultural Organization of UN
Número de Páginas 60 pages
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave Risk Management, Financial Inclusion, Access to Markets
Recursos Relacionados
Fair Play: Ensuring Competition in Digital Financial Services Paper 2019

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Rural Financial Services: General, Collateral regulation, Prudential regulation

Providing guidance to financial sector regulators for identifying anti-competitive behavior

In many emerging economies, digital financial services (DFS) markets are limited to one or two major providers, reducing innovation, customer choice and potentially facilitating monopolistic or cartelistic behavior. Why are DFS markets prone to concentration? Is this a problem?

This primer applies a framework to help answer these questions and demonstrate how regulation can have a substantial impact on competitive dynamics in the DFS marketplace. The paper also proposes regulatory levers that policy makers can use to promote more competition. Looking ahead, a competitive landscape becomes especially important given the rising importance of customer data and the entry of large, multinational technology companies into DFS markets.

Autor Matthew Soursourian & Ariadne Plaitakis
Editor CGAP
Número de Páginas 32 pages
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave Competition, digital financial services, emerging economies, customer choice, multinational technology
Recursos Relacionados
Gender Self-Assessment Toolkit for Financial Service Providers Toolkit 2019

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Rural Financial Services: General, Gender, Inclusive finance

UNCDF, under its ASEAN regional and country programme, has developed a toolkit composed of an institutional gender self-assessment tool (GSAT) and a standardised process with facilitator guides to support FSPs in reviewing and evaluating their existing gender approach. This includes identifying the linkages that exist among: a) their business goals and profit; b) effectively serving the women’s market and; c) promoting women’s workforce participation and leadership. The toolkit aims to enhance FSPs’ institutional policies, practices and performance towards - Increasing targeted outreach to women clients through gender-sensitive products and services; and promoting workforce gender diversity in management and leadership.

Rural finance in Sierra Leone strengthened by IFAD projects – new report Report 2019

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Rural Financial Services: General, Rural outreach, Rural Invest

Rural development projects financed and supported by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) expanded access to rural finance and increased agricultural production in Sierra Leone, despite the civil war (1991-2002) and Ebola epidemic (2014-2015), according to a new report released on 27 November 2019. The report prepared by the Independent Office of Evaluation of IFAD (IOE), reviews the past 17 years of work that IFAD carried out in partnership with the government of Sierra Leone, from 2003 to 2019.

According to the report’s findings, IFAD increased the reach of rural finance – including to remote areas – to an even larger group than originally planned. Over 280,000 households were reached through rural finance initiatives in the Northern, Southern and Eastern Provinces - more than 120 per cent of the envisaged target. 

Digital Financial Services in Nigeria: State of the Market Report 2019 Paper 2019

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Este recurso aparece en: Business Support Services: General, ICT applications, Servicios financieros rurales

In-depth exploration of consumer profiles, the gender gap, and a review of DFS policy landscape.

The 2019 Digital Financial Services in Nigeria State of Market Report is the fourth in the series and presents consumer and gender profiles with more contextual relevance and linkages. It contains key insights from analysis of disaggregated data on banked, under-banked and unbanked adult Nigerians and also the widening gender gap. 

There is also a high-level review of the progress of market-enabling policy recommendations made in 2017. The section explores how much progress has been made so far, which recommendations have been implemented and which ones are outstanding. 

Autor Olanrewaju Adelaja, Olubanjo Adetunji, Olawale Ajai, Timothy Aluko, Olayinka David-West, Nkemdilim Iheanachor, Emmanuel Ogbu, Omotayo Muritala, Ijeoma Nwagwu, Ibukun Taiwo, Samuel Umoh & Immanuel Umukoro
Editor Sustainable and Inclusive Digital Financial Services (SIDFS)
Número de Páginas 107 pages
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global, Africa
Nigeria
Palabras clave digital financial services, Market Assessments, Sub-Saharan Africa, Nigeria
Recursos Relacionados
GFiN - One Year On Report 2019

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales

The Global Financial Inclusion Network (GFiN) is a network of international regulators and related organizations committed to supporting financial innovation and to creating a framework for co-operation between regulators to share experiences and approaches to innovation. The GFiN has rapidly grown over the past year from its 12 founding members, to be a global dialogue with 35 Member Regulators and 7 Observers from 21 jurisdictions. 

This report sets out what the GFiN has been doing over the past year, the challenges it has faced, achievements, and its ambitions for the future. It also aims to show that it is listening to stakeholders, and welcomes feedback in order to ensure that the GFiN continues to add value.

Key facts about the GFiN:

  • 35 members and 7 observers from 21 jurisdictions.
  • 99 responses from 26 jurisdictions received in response to the initial GFiN consultation.
  • 44 applications from 17 jurisdictions for the inaugural GFiN cross-border test pilot with 8 firms being selected to develop testing plans.
  • Nearly 60 representatives attended the first biannual meeting of the GFiN held in London in May.
Guidebook for mobilizing inclusive remittances for rural investment Guideline 2018

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Remittances and payments, Investment, Investment: General

This Guidebook compiles the lessons learned from the implementation of the IFAD-funded Remittances and Diaspora Investment for Rural Development (2014-2018). Its purpose is to provide financial service providers, government agencies, and other stakeholders in migration and rural development with an in-depth understanding of the potential in inclusive remittances, the steps required to launch an inclusive remittances business line, the estimated costs, and the expected financial and social benefits of this emerging business opportunity.

It also serves as a programme document, outlining the implementation process and the results achieved.

Editor IFAD
Número de Páginas 52 pages
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global
Palabras clave inclusive remittances, rural investment
Recursos Relacionados
Financial Inclusion and Resilience: How BRAC’s Microfinance Program Recovered from the West Africa Ebola Crisis Case Study 2017 English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Microfinance institutions, Inclusive finance

In July 2014, at the height of the Ebola virus disease outbreak, BRAC’s microfinance institutions (MFIs) in Liberia and Sierra Leone were confronted with two competing scenarios of how to move forward. Path one: revise operations in a challenging, volatile situation and press on, despite the threat to staff and clients’ health. Path two: pause operations, establish protocols to protect staff, clients and relationships, but risk long-term recovery and customer loyalty. 

As the crisis escalated, there were several contributing factors that made it irresponsible—and therefore in BRAC’s eyes, impossible—for BRAC to continue operating. The economic situation worsened and a state of emergency was declared in each country. Markets shut down and clients’ businesses struggled to stay afloat. Restrictions on gatherings and movement were put in place, making it extremely challenging for credit officers to collect payments. Group meetings, the established platform for collections and disbursements, were not permitted, which prohibited credit officers and clients from meeting. When borders closed, and major airlines began cancelling flights, panic became even more widespread. Like many other international non-governmental organizations, BRAC sent its international staff in both countries home, including key managers of BRAC’s MFIs. At the time, though more than 90 percent of BRAC’s staff in both countries were nationals, the majority of senior management (area managers and higher) were international. This became a key factor in BRAC’s ability to continue operating throughout the crisis.

This case study traces the effect of the Ebola crisis on the operations of BRAC’s MFIs. It examines the MFIs’ reaction to the crisis, and the repercussions of the suspension on operational viability, revealing lessons on how to build institutional resilience, that apply both to BRAC and the broader microfinance community. The case study also examines the resilience of clients themselves measured by their ability to repay loans after collections restarted, with the hopes of gaining a deeper perspective into their strategies for coping during and after the crisis. 

Document  -  English (en)

Autor Hitoishi Chakma, Emily Coppel, Aissatou Diallo, Rod Dubitsky, Isabel Whisson
Editor BRAC
Número de Páginas 22
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global, Africa
Liberia, Sierra Leone
Palabras clave Ebola, Microfinance Institution, emergency response
Recursos Relacionados
Farmers’ Willingness to Pay for Index-Based Livestock Insurance in the North West of South Africa Article English (en)

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Este recurso aparece en: Servicios financieros rurales, Insurance

Rural livelihoods in most developing countries are threatened by climate-related risks such as drought, flood, heat waves, storms, and so on. Although farmers have adopted several adaptation strategies, they have proven less effective than hoped. Hence, index-based livestock insurance, an innovation that significantly assists farmers to acclimatise to climate-related risks, has been proposed; and its adaptability has attracted a notable increase in other African countries. However, the success of its adoption is dependent on the inclination of the farmers to pay for the service.

Accordingly, this study investigates their willingness to pay for index-based livestock insurance and its determinants, and the factors influencing the total livestock units to be insured in the North West province of South Africa. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 277 cattle farmers, drawn randomly from the study area. The contingent valuation method was applied to determine the farmers’ willingness to pay; and only 10.8% were willing to pay. Simultaneously, the Heckit sample selection model was used to analyse the data to identify the factors responsible for farmers’ willingness to pay and total livestock units to insure. The findings revealed that farmer’s experience, age, education, marital status, awareness of insurance and household dependents were statistically significant, and influenced the maximum price R600 ($42, max willingness to pay, WTP) of those who accepted index-based livestock insurance. However, by implication, the study concluded that to adopt index-based livestock insurance in the study area among the livestock farmers, there should be policies to cater for the aforementioned factors.

Document  -  English (en)

Autor Oluwaseun Samuel Oduniyi, Michael Akwasi Antwi, Sibongile Sylvia Tekana
Editor Climate — Open Access Journal
Número de Páginas 13
Idioma Principal English (en)
Región / País Global, Africa
South Africa
Palabras clave Agricultural Risk, Livestock Insurance, Index Insurance, South Africa
Recursos Relacionados

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